„Song of Myself“


“I am of old and young, of the foolish as much as the wise,
Regardless of others, ever regardful of others,
Maternal as well as paternal, a child as well as a man,
Stuff’d with the stuff that is coarse and stuff’d with the stuff that
is fine,
One of the Nation of many nations, the smallest the same and the
largest the same,
A Southerner soon as a Northerner […],
A learner with the simplest, a teacher of the thoughtfullest,
A novice beginning yet experient of myriads of seasons,
Of every hue and caste am I, of every rank and religion,
A farmer, mechanic, artist, gentleman, sailor, quaker,
Prisoner, fancy‐man, rowdy, lawyer, physician, priest.

I resist any thing better than my own diversity,
Breathe the air but leave plenty after me,
And am not stuck up, and am in my place.
Do I contradict myself?
Very well then I contradict myself,
(I am large, I contain multitudes.)”


(Walt Whitman, „Song of myself“, in: Ders., Leaves of Grass, 1891‐92, Auszüge aus Nr. 16 und 51)